Dinner at Chef’s Table at Lebua

Dinner at Chef’s Table at Lebua

at Chef's Table on 6 October 2019
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The restaurants where Chef Vincent Thierry trained his classical French cooking reads like the Who is Who in France. From Le Cinq to Alain Ducasse, he has been everywhere. For now 14 years he cooks in Asia and achieved three stars in Le Caprice in Hong Kong before moving to open the Chef’s Table at the Lebua. This former office tower houses now lots of restaurants and bars and is swiftly becoming the epicentre of fine dining in Bangkok.
The restaurant is stunning. Former round balconies were converted into small lounges which each table overlooking the kitchen which is in the center of the restaurant while having its own privacy, a great accomplishment.
The kitchen is a low circle with a enormous dome over it which houses the ventilation and creates a beautiful structure.

My friend Peter aka @growingboy was there in April of this year and raved about the food, so my expectations were as high as the 62nd floor on which the restaurant is located. The cuisine is classic French, about 80% locally sourced and perfectly executed. The dishes all show there heritage but at the same time are somewhat simplified. There are fewer flavours on the plate, it comes across as restrained and focused. Instead the Chef plays with texture and acidity.
Case in point is my favourite dish, the sea urchin. Served in a bowl resembling a sea urchin shell, it combines the sea urchin with cauliflower, eggs and saffron. This creates a wonderful play with the crunchy texture of the cauliflower and softness of the sea urchin while at the same time setting the sweetness of the sea urchin against the acidity of the cauliflower and saffron.
Similarly the Foie Gras, perfectly cleaned and cooked to perfection, it is covered with a bed of Citrus mosaic. Here again, sweetness against acidity, softness against crunchiness, all served in an emulsion of Fondant Carrots.
The meat course, a duo of Chalans duck breast and the leg in an artichoke purée, was as good as it gets. The breast almost raw, a wonderful flavour but still enough bite so you know you are eating a duck.

This is French dining at its best. I would be not surprised if this place enters very high this year's Guide Michelin.

Classic French
9 / 10